Social Studies

Department Head: Mrs. Cathryn Martin
 
DEPARTMENT GOALS
 
In Social Studies, the goal is for all students to develop a deep, rich network of understandings related to the world around them. The objectives and competencies included in this curriculum deal with history, geography, economics, and civics from a diverse, global perspective. Students engage in projects that require them to apply Social Studies skills in real-world contexts.

COURSE OFFERINGS

WORLD GEOGRAPHY
 
World Geography is a basic course required for graduation, incorporating the features of physical, cultural, and political geography. The course is designed to prepare students for the study of American History, Civics, and World History at Teurlings and at the college level, with emphasis on how we, as Americans, fit into world society. The course stresses coverage of current events, as well as traditional geographic themes. Students will study the physical features that shape the earth and its land masses, as well as the ways the weather, climate, and man affect the earth's physical structures. In additional, students will learn about the cultural regions of the earth. This part of the course focuses on the people: their history, languages, customs, religions, foods and industries. The final aspect of the course is political geography, where the political systems of individual countries and regions are studied.
 
WORLD GEOGRAPHY (HONORS)
 
Honors World Geography is a faster paced version of World Geography, incorporating the features of physical and political geography with an emphasis on cultural, historical, and social geography. The course is designed to prepare students for advanced study through the DE program in World and US History. Additional readings, more projects, and independent study are required in the course. Applicants must meet honors program standards.
 
CIVICS
 
Citizenship education is the ultimate goal of any Civics class. The Constitution, federal system of government, and state and local governments are covered in this course. The infusion of one's duties and responsibilities as a member of our society is taught in conjunction with the economic role of the individual and family. These concepts are enhanced by observing the process in action, through a comprehensive look at current events, as well as speakers from the community who can give personal insight into the government process.
 
CIVICS (HONORS)
 
The pace is quicker and the course relies more heavily on independent work than the regular Civics class in stressing citizenship education. The Constitution, federal system of government, and state and local government structure are studied in depth. Applicants must meet honors program standards.
 
U.S. HISTORY
 
This course is designed to study the origins of our nation’s democracy and its development and expansion to include all citizens over the last 200 plus years with special significance placed on events from the Civil War to the present. It will touch upon the economic as well as social changes experienced by the nation. Foreign policy and the rise of the United States to its role in world leadership in today’s global economy is also examined. Students will be expected to make comparisons between past and current events. Tests will be a combination of both objective and essay questions.
 
U.S. HISTORY (DUAL ENROLLMENT)
 
The purpose of this course is to study the history of America at a faster pace and in greater detail than regular American History. Students will be asked to meet the same objectives as regular American History but will also be required to read and analyze historical documents. Tests will consist of objective as well as several essay questions. Students will also be required to apply material learned in class and create new conclusions. To be eligible to enroll, students must have a 20 composite on the ACT with a score of 22 on the Reading portion.
 
WORLD HISTORY
 
This course stresses the development of western civilization, from its prehistoric roots to conflicts in the modern 20th Century. Emphasis is placed on historical cause and effect and the people responsible for the events that shaped mankind, rather than the memorization of dates focusing on events from the Renaissance to the present.
 
WORLD HISTORY (DUAL ENROLLMENT)
 
This course is a study of the basic chronology and major events and trends from approximately 1450 to the present. The goals of the Advanced Placement program in world history are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history and (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence. The student is required to read and evaluate various primary and secondary source materials from different cultures and ages. Special emphasis is placed on the relationships of different cultures in man’s drive toward civilization. To be eligible to enroll, students must have a 20 composite on the ACT with a score of 22 on the Reading portion.
 
PSYCHOLOGY
 
This is an introductory Psychology course which provides a foundation in the basic theories and principles of psychology to guide students toward a greater understanding of their own capacity for growth. Traditional topics include: personality, learning, and social psychology. Also included are the areas of: child and adolescent development; the brain and dreams; the troubled personality; and parapsychology. Various schools of psychology are introduced, also providing benefits from the findings in a field that touches virtually every aspect of our daily lives.
 
SOCIOLOGY
 
This is an introductory course which provides a foundation in the basic theories and principles of sociology and man’s place within society to guide students toward a greater understanding of their capacity for growth within society. Various disciplines in sociology will also be introduced.